Trade: Senior Squids | Capital City Income

 

Hill, Rich ($15)
2020 Draft Pick, Round 3 (Capital City Income)

Senior Squids trades away
Gattis, Evan ($9)
2020 Draft Pick, Round 2 (Senior Squids

 

Hustle’s $.02

From a value standpoint. I think the trade is pretty even. Rich Hill clearly is the more risk reward player here and probably warrants the pick upgrade. This pick upgrade is for 2020 so it could be an upgrade of one pick or as many as 32. I’m going to guess in between.

For Bailey: I understand the appeal. He has some pitcher depth (after acquiring Happ/Vargas) and having a capable 2nd catcher is very useful in this league. Currently he has Martin as his guy, and that’s likely not to change on most nights. Catchers get hurt, and Gattis is a huge upgrade to anything he could get on the wire. It’s also useful for those days Martin just won’t play.  It was about 2.5 months ago when Bailey traded away a 3rd rounder (essentially), Chris Carter, and Grichuk for  Hill.  Grichuk has been worthless and won’t be kept and Chris Carter has been a sparingly useful 1b/UTIl (5 pph) on the last place team.  So he’s played musical chairs with some assets and ended up with a very nice backup catcher. If Rich Hill does get it going, this may look foolish with the current pitching landscape. I’d say on the surface this looks like Bailey selling high after one of Hill’s best starts, but it’s not like the sell-high netted too much.

Bailey’s Rating: /5 Sticks

 

For Elton: We’ll find out pretty soon how this deal goes, because Rich Hill is the only real factor here. I think he’s going to either be a very good-great pitcher averaging close to or over 30 ppg or he’s going to continue to implode and the Dodgers will give him less starts and perhaps put him in the pen.  He’s basically either a $30-40 pitcher or a $0 one. The Dodgers paid him, so he’ll get his chance, but there are some red flags in healthy, age, some diminished stuff, and the Dodgers have a plethora of options.

In a year where pitching is so difficult is the answer to just get more bullets or just strengthening your hitting and hope for the best on pitching? Squids is clearly doing the former.

The catcher isn’t so much a need for Squids because he has Zunino and Gary Sanchez. For me, this is a low risk “I’m going for it” deal.  At 5-7 Squids chances at playoffs are losing steam each week so he needs to do something now and pitching is his biggest need. If he thinks he can do it, then I really like this deal for him.  If he doesn’t make playoffs and Rich Hill is a pumpkin, then he loses a trade chip in Gattis, but hardly a significant one.

Squids Ratings Rating   / 5 Sticks

 

 

 

Trade: Team Hydra | Capital City Income

 

Team Hydra trades away
Vargas, Jason ($3)
Happ, J.A. ($5)

Capital City Ironmen trades away
Ray, Corey
Travis, Devon ($11)

Hustle’s .02

When I went to take a piss at 5 in the morning I checked my phone and saw the email notification of this trade. With my senses barely there, I though this was a steal for Bailey.  Having had my breakfast, coffee, and shower…I pondered the trade some more.  I still think this is a good trade for Bailey, but more justified from Hydra’s stand point.

Firstly, I’m not a big Corey Ray fan. Moderate power and some above average speed which isn’t worth a lot in this format. In 2017 he’s striking out a ton with a .148 ISO in High A. If it wasn’t for him being the 5th pick last year (and a top 3 pick in our draft) he’d be completely off my radar.  He’s still a bit away, isn’t that exciting (to me), and plays a deep position where you’ll really need to produce to be a contributor. On the other side, he’s young and has the pedigree to improve and be an impact player.

Devon Travis at $13 next year?  This was famously a Dusty trade and  drop and I believe the biggest FAAB acquisition in league history (Otani aside). I think a healthy Devon Travis is worth 13 bucks, maybe a few more. So there’s value here if he manages to stay healthy which he never has. Hydra doesn’t have a 2b to build around and maybe Travis is it. Travis is out for a significant amount of time, but Hydra has thrown their hat out of race for 2017.

The haul for Bailey is 2 veteran pitchers in Happ and Vargas. Vargas is obviously playing out of his mind now.  I assume nobody was giving a big haul for a 34 year old having a career season averaging 30 points per game.  JA Happ on the other hand was great last year and only recently picked things up with back to back 40+ point games. I think both are probably around top 75 pitchers (maybe better), which in this league is very relevant.  Bailey’s pitching core is greatly improved from 2 players who won’t effect his bottom line this year.

I get that Hydra wanted to trade two 34 year olds because they could possibly be exposed and have very little value by season’s end. I think chances are one of them will be a very good value to keep next year, but it is unclear which. Even if we can predict Jason Vargas for having a good 2018 season, he’s still in the twilight of his career and getting 2 young assets is perhaps more intriguing. If this was the best they could get in their eyes, then that’s the market.. it feels a tad light.

Ultimately the trade is fine for both teams. If I’m Hydra, I would have liked someone better than Corey Ray, but this is a totally a prospect personal preference criticism.

 

 

TRADE: Foundation | We Talk Fantasy Sports

WTFS receives a $6 Melky Cabrera

Foundation receives a $5 Didi Gregorious

This trade is as pretty close to even as you can get.  Both are solid regulars who you’d expect to average between 4.5 and 5.5 points per game.  The main difference here is one plays a much more scarce position. With Jordan losing Jean Segura to the DL, he is probably going to benefit more in this trade than Keith will, and that’s not to say Keith did anything bad here.

I think being able to cycle through the OFs Jordan has (Harper, Thames, Calhoun, Granderson, etc), it was more valuable for him to get to turn an expendable. Melky into a sure fire play every day SS for him. Hopefully Torres’ eventual call up doesn’t limit Didi’s playing time, but even if it does, it was a risk worth taking.

 

Keith has Hernan Perez and Elvis Andrus to man SS, so trading his depth there will allow him to fill holes in his outfield.  Plus, if Keith decides to keep Buxton again, he can keep a very cheap outfielder in Melky to partially make up for that mistake.

Breaking down the math

2018: $40 Buxton- Not ideal

2018: $48 Buxton and Melky- Less not ideal

 

 

 

 

TRADE: Foundation + Capital City Ironmen

 

 

Hustle’s Take

Oh look, the commissioners trade with each other again, and only a few days before the one year anniversary of the infamous James Shields trade. Truth be told, the trade is very similar in structure.  Two upgraded picks for a player. The picks are worse this time.

 

That being said I love this trade for Bailey.  He has a glut of 2b in Devon Travis (hey Dusty), Neil Walker (who Jordan traded to Bailey), Marwin Gonzeles, and  Chris Owings. Also, he has Ian Happ in his minors that he could call up at any moment. Basically, there’s no way he’s going to remotely miss Jed Lowrie.

Jed Lowrie is 33, playing in Oakland, very injury prone, and currently over performing. He’s over 6 points per game at the moment, which is very good for any player and even better for a 2b.  Generally I think Jed Lowrie is an underrated player in this format when healthy and has a clear role, but he’s nothing special. When you’re owning Darwin Barney, I think you probably need to make a move for some middle infield depth or be more aggressive on the wire.

That being said, I think two 2nd rounders is a pretty steep price for Lowrie.  Does Bailey actually say no to one 2nd rounder with that depth? Did he? I’d say it would be pretty irresponsible to say no to 1 for him unless he was confident he could milk 2 (which he did).

I get Jordan hating prospects and picks, but a 2nd rounder was selling for 5-7 bucks last year.  I can’t get behind selling 2 of them for Lowrie. As our minor league player pool shallows out with getting 5 spots a year, the upper round picks in theory should be worth more. I also think Jordan could have used the other 2nd rounder as a trade chip in a different more impactful deal down the line. Now we probably see Bailey use Jordan’s pick somehow.

I’d be pretty surprised if Lowrie moved the needle for Jordan this season, but if it does, it’s worth it.

Dynasty Grinders Class-A All-Star Bats

Using our scoring system, I pulled all Class-A hitters stats from MILB.com to find out who has been dominating the league.

Just 10 of the top 50 hitters there are owned, including three by Hydra – Yoan Moncada, Bobby Bradley and Jorge Mateo.

TBD was the only other owner with more than one – Eloy Jimenez and Josh Ockimey.

The Cleveland Indians feature seven players in the top 50:

  • Greg Allen
  • Tyler Krieger
  • Nathan Lukes
  • Bobby Bradley
  • Yu-Cheng Chang
  • Connor Marabell
  • Francisco Mejia

Add those prospects to Bradley Zimmer, Clint Frazier and a handful of pitching prospects and the Indians are setup for a very successful future.

This is the farm system of a team that just won 14 games in row and sits 6.5 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers, in first place of the American League Central division.

Thanks to 40 doubles, yes 40, Brian Mundell has 20 more total bases than Eloy Jimenez, who is 2nd.  That, plus just 48 strikeouts = future major league hitter.

He was drafted out of college in the 2015 draft and at 22 years old could speed through the Rockies farm system.  It is also very likely that an American League team would love to have him as a DH.

HLR’s Travis Demeritte has hit 20 home runs but also has 105 strikeouts.  He has already served an 80-game suspension after testing positive for a performance-enhancing substance and the Rangers moved him to 2B with Adrian Beltre and Joey Gallo ahead of him.  But now with the rise of Rougned Odor and Jurickson Profar back, it could be a while before Demeritte finds a spot with the Rangers.  It wouldn’t surprise me to see him dealt at the deadline or this offseason.

a1-20 a21-40 a41-50

On baseball’s proposed rule to raise the strike zone…

It seems to have went under the radar, but back in May, Major League Baseball took steps toward making changes to the strike zone. You can read about it here. The gist of it is pretty simple: the bottom of the strike zone would be raised, which should/could, in theory, cause a rise in walks and/or a spike in offense in general.

If you click that link, perhaps the same thing will jump out at you that jumped out at me. Check out this excerpt:

My interpretation of that point is that, because umpires are calling the strike zone incorrectly, MLB will make changes to the zone itself rather than address it with those responsible for calling balls and strikes. This is, to me at least, somewhat counter-intuitive. Or maybe they’ve already tried and failed to correct the problem with their umpires. Who knows?

It’s 2016. We have the technology to call balls and strikes digitally, but beyond that, we have the ability to measure the performance of the human beings calling them by eye. In theory, at least, MLB could reinforce the desired strike zone to all of its officials, then penalize those who do not adhere to the rules. If the umpires interpretation of the strike zone is the issue, then the problem lies with the umps, not the zone. It doesn’t make a ton of sense to fix the thing that isn’t broken so that the thing that is broken can better function.

The funny thing is, I like human umpires. I get frustrated from time to time with their performance, but I generally enjoy the three-way chess match that occurs between hitter, pitcher, and umpire. I like that a zone can grow as a game goes on because a pitcher has displayed pinpoint accuracy. I like the groan of a crowd on a borderline pitch. I know it’s sub-optimal and undercuts the competition to some degree, but as a spectator, it’s something I like.

Having said that, I also quite like pitching. I enjoy a 15-12 game from time to time too, but my preference would be a well-pitched, well-paced 3-1 game where pitchers are buckling hitters’ knees and throwing gas past their bats. If the change to the zone does in fact increase offense through a greater volume of walks and, perhaps, balls in play*, I imagine some of the work baseball has done to increase pace of play becomes compromised. More offense means longer games and it also means less good pitching performances to watch.

* The article linked above has some quotes that suggest balls in play won’t be heightened, but I think that’s posturing. If the bottom of the zone is further off the ground, I can’t envision how there wouldn’t be more balls in play. Pitchers would presumably be aiming higher, even if just by fractions of an inch, with their pitches. If they miss, they miss a little bit higher. That’s good for hitters.

As Cubs manager Joe Maddon eludes to in that article, it’s possible that all the change does is increase the number of pitches taken and walks, at which point all that’s really happening — for the spectator, at least — is less action at a slower pace. I’m not sure why anyone would want that. His underlying point, I think, is that we can theorize all we want about what the change will cause, but until we test it out in live situations — say, spring training — we’re not going to know for sure.

For me though, it just comes back to accountability of the umpires. Their job is not easy. It seems easy watching from our sofas, but it’s not. Still, MLB has the ability to identify which guys are doing a good job and which are not, which should be enough to implement change without tinkering with the rules.